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Strait Shipwreck the Grampian Castle Anglesey

Fri 11th November 2016

A shipwreck becomes visible at very low tide at Llanddwyn Bay in the Menai Strait. It is the remains of the Grampian Castle, an offshore oil industry vessel, which ran aground on 2 March 1987.

Rumor has it that the crew got into difficulty and abandoned ship. In darkness of night they had run into the notorious shifting sandbank at the mouth of the Strait off Newborough.

We filmed our trip at a super low tide when parts of the wreck are visible. The kids loved the glimmering hull and inspecting the special marine life.

It was truly magical…

The Grampian Castle

The vessel was built by Henry Scarr Ltd of Hessle, a Yorkshire town 5 miles west of Kingston upon Hull,  in 1956. The available technical specifications stated the vessel was 398 tonnes, and 137 foot long by 28 foot wide and 14 foot depth.

When built it was a fishing trawler called the ‘Boston Seafoam’. It was renamed the ‘Arkinholm’ and ‘Westleigh’. Then it became a pollution control standby vessel for the offshore oil industry, named the ‘Grampian Castle’.

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The Seagulls are the kings of the castle

The Shipwreck

On 2 March 1987, while owned by George Craig & Sons Ltd of Aberdeen it ran aground. On 6 April 1987 it was reported that the wreck had been looted.

In January 1988, it was reported that salvage attempts were to be made by Ansar Shipbreaking of Eastham. However, all salvage attempts were abandoned.

On 24 January 1991, the wreck was struck by a fishing vessel named ‘Saphire’, this vessel was abandoned and later sank.

Ref: http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/271301/details/grampian-castle

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During certain tide conditions, get up close

Book the whole boat for a special trip to spot shipwrecks on the Anglesey coast. Please talk to us to help you make plans as some wrecks are only visible at super low tides.

The wreck if the Grampian Castle

The wreck if the Grampian Castle

Book now, go to ‘contact-us‘.